TEN Exhibition GROUP SHOW 2019

TEN PAINTINGS BY TEN ARTISTS

White Canvas Space presents an exhibition of ten contemporary painted works surveying the ways that painters continue to explore and re-invent abstract painting. Ten Queensland artists with individual painting practices are invited to participate in the exhibition exploring paint as the idea, the subject, and the medium, on large scale landscape or portrait formats. Formalism, abstraction, and the stylisation of a number of personal and historical realities are expressed through spatial and figurative painterly renditions. The significance of the number ten is threefold: The number of artists; The paintings exhibited; The numerology of ten (10) symbolising the completion of a set and, or a new beginning inspiring new behaviours and interpretations of ways of being in the world.

 

The featured ten artists are Kate Barry, Peter Ceredig-Evans, Kieran Forster, Louise Isackson, Robbi Kirk, Harry Macintosh, Andrew O’Brien, Paula Payne, Llewellyn Skye and Amica Whincop. The Exhibition Curators,  Robyn Kirk, Louise Isackson and Paula Payne have selected the artists for their familiarity with abstract interpretations.

TEN EXHIBITION ESSAY

White Canvas Space presents an exhibition of ten contemporary painted works surveying the ways that painters continue to explore and re-invent abstract painting. Ten Queensland artists with individual painting practices are invited to participate in the exhibition exploring paint as the idea, the subject, and the medium, on large scale landscape or portrait formats. Formalism, abstraction, and the stylisation of a number of personal and historical realities are expressed through spatial and figurative painterly renditions. The significance of the number ten is threefold: The number of artists; The paintings exhibited; The numerology of ten (10) symbolising the completion of a set and, or a new beginning inspiring new behaviours and interpretations of ways of being in the world.

 

The featured ten artists are Kate Barry, Peter Ceredig-Evans, Kieran Forster, Louise Isackson, Robbi Kirk, Harry Macintosh, Andrew O’Brien, Paula Payne, Llewellyn Skye and Amica Whincop. The Exhibition Curators,  Robyn Kirk, Louise Isackson and Paula Payne have selected the artists for their familiarity with abstract interpretations.

 

The 21st century is characterised by globalisation and a media infused technological world, yet artists continue to explore a painted pictorial logic, the question arises, why painting, why now?  One of the attractions may be that painting and its process driven production takes time; time to think, play, and secure an image. In many ways painting can be considered a conversation with time, as the act of painting can represent long durations of creative practice influenced by the visual, and painted origins. As an artform painting is deeply historical, self-reflexive and manages to encompass elements of yesterday, today and at times predictions of tomorrow. The painter expresses discourses and thoughts of the world through working with materiality, context and painted conditions that come together as images, during a search for a personal voice. 

 

In the text Contemporary Painting in Context 2013, Peter Weibel discusses the transformation of visuality throughout history, Weibel states that; “The primary place of the visual is visible nature, and in the natural worlds of perception, visuality is universal.”  Because the imitative arts were prominent in the history of easel painting, the visual arts are, and continues to be associated with easel painting. In this context, visuality is represented through oil paint, brushes and mimetic imagery. The skillful mimicry of nature through colour and mark were considered, and still to some extent the mark of an accomplished painter.

 

Although painting may have originated in a technical mimetic context those who paint understand there is an imagining that will not be defeated that arises from the symbolic and painterly nature and the very act of working with paint.  Weibel describes a style of painting, as generating ‘“pleasure, and will not be reduced to technical mediation, in spite of every surrender and analysis.” For many painters, this may ring true, yet the pleasure for painters is to respond in empathetic and visceral ways through paint and visual languages that are relevant to the maker and the time in which works are produced. In this context, painting can be identified in a number of terms; as an ongoing search for a way to define meaning, a visual language, an expressive response to experience, and a seeking of a particular kind of pleasure.

 

In any context, painting remains deeply connected to its origins and all paintings exist as images that continue from points of reference or departure to be re-invigorated and or explored. By referring to the historical in a search for meaning the horizon is extended, as are interpretations that refer to the origin of the new or extended painting. In this case, the history of painting and the history of the visual itself extends from and toward beginnings new and old.

 

In this exhibition you will experience the layers of time that are expressed through many influences and languages that have evolved from the origins of painting to the present. Each artist is interested in extending their own visual language through particular ways of seeing and applying the medium through mark, form, space, colour, fat and lean paint. The artist's intention is to communicate visually with the viewer through an insight, a glimpse into a feeling, a meaning, or story to be shared. By reflecting imagery back into the world, an act of giving transpires and an exchange of the visual kind detaches from its maker and into the world.

 

Ten works are presented in the context of contemporary art and design as ten voices that respond to historical and contemporary worlds that exist in the realms of visuality. 

 

 

Essay by: Paula Payne

Brisbane, May 2019

www.paulapayne.com.au

_____________

 

Peter Weibel, “Pittura/immedia: Painting in the nineties between mediated visuality and visuality in context,” in Contemporary painting in context, ed. Anne Ring  Peterson (University of Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 2013).